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Wolf Facts

Gregor's red wolf (Canis lupus gregoryi), also known as Gregory's wolf, is a subspecies of the red wolf described in 1937 by Edward Alphonso Goldman. Its current taxonomy as a subspecies of grey wolf or red wolf is not yet clear, with some authors classifying Gregor's red wolf as either species.
  • 1 min reading
The Bernard's wolf (Canis lupus bernardi) also known as Victoria Island wolf or Banks Island wolf is a subspecies of the grey wolf. This canid was identified in 1943 by zoologist John Anderson. The skin and skull of an adult male had been brought back by Pierre Bernard, hence the name "Bernardi" in Latin.
  • 1 min reading

The Cascade Mountain wolf (Canis lupus fuscus) was a subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). This canid was described by Edward Alphonso Goldman in 1945. Nevertheless, the first description was made earlier by Sir John Richardson in 1839 and is the authoritative description of the current taxonomy. The Cascade wolf is also known as the brown wolf or Oregon wolf.

  • 1 min reading
The Florida black wolf (Canis lupus floridanus) is one of the subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). This canid was officially declared extinct in 1921, although it has not been seen in the wild since 1908. Its status was long controversial, as it was once considered a subspecies of the red wolf (Canis rufus). The Florida black wolf is also known as the Florida wolf or black wolf.
  • 2 min reading
The Newfoundland wolf (Canis lupus beothucus) is an extinct subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). This canid was officially declared extinct in 1930. The Newfoundland wolf was described in 1937 by zoologists Glover Morrill Allen and Thomas Barbour.
  • 2 min reading
The Kenai Peninsula wolf (Canis lupus alces) is a subspecies of the grey wolf. This canid was the largest wolf in North America before it was exterminated by man. The Kenai Peninsula wolf was described by Edward Alphonso Goldman in 1941.
  • 2 min reading
The Yukon wolf (Canis lupus pambasileus) also known as Interior Alaskan wolf is a subspecies of the grey wolf. This canid is one of the largest of the species Canis lupus in North America. Its Latin name was given to it in 1905 by the American zoologist Daniel Giraud Elliot. Some scientists believe that it is just a close relative of the Alaskan tundra wolf (Canis lupus tundrarum).
  • 2 min reading
The Greenland wolf (Canis lupus orion) is a subspecies of the grey wolf. It was described by the British zoologist Reginald Innes Pocock in 1935.
  • 2 min reading
The Baffin Island wolf (Canis lupus manningi) is a subspecies of the grey wolf. This canid is endemic to Baffin Island and several nearby islands. It was described in 1943 by zoologist Thomas Henry Manning, who spent a year and a half mapping the island.

Early records and evidence suggest that wolves living west of Greenland migrated to Baffin Island and are therefore descendants of this subspecies. In 1966, a study was conducted on the Baffin Island wolf, a preliminary assessment of which had been made the previous year in 1965 at Wordie Bay by the University of Toronto. Today, this wolf is listed as an endangered subspecies.
  • 2 min reading
The Mackenzie wolf (Canis lupus mackenzii) is a subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). Its range covers the Mackenzie River basin in Canada. The Mackenzie wolf can be found in Jack London's novel "White Fang".

The Mackenzie wolf was recognized as a subspecies in 1943. In 1992, it was reclassified and is now part of the subspecies of the Canadian wolf (Canis lupus occidentalis).
  • 2 min reading
The Eastern wolf (Canis lycaon) is a carnivorous mammal belonging to the canid family. Long considered a subspecies of the gray wolf, genetic testing in 2003 formalized its status as a distinct species.
  • 3 min reading
The Labrador wolf (Canis lupus labradorius) is a subspecies of the grey wolf (Canis lupus). This canid is one of the least studied because it is very fearful. It was described in 1937 by the biologist Edward Alphonso Goldman.
  • 2 min reading
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